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#PGAwards Twitter Highlights & More

Posted By Administration, Thursday, January 28, 2016

 


 


 


 



Producers Guild Facebook Album

 

 

January 23, 2016 at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza in Los Angeles

Posted by The Producers Guild of America on Monday, January 25, 2016


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Results- Producers Guild Awards 2016

Posted By Administration, Saturday, January 23, 2016
Updated: Friday, January 22, 2016

Held in January, the Producers Guild Awards is a must-attend event for the industry, and represents a unique chance for PGA members to support their Guild and pay tribute to the best of their profession.  The 27th Annual Producers Guild Awards were held at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel January 23, 2016.  The 2016 Producers Guild nominated projects are listed below by category, accompanied with producers’ names. Winners are in bold.  Photos and additional media will be posted shortly.

 


The Darryl F. Zanuck Award for Outstanding Producer of Theatrical Motion Pictures:

  •  The Big Short

Producers: Brad Pitt & Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner

  • Bridge of Spies

Producers: Steven Spielberg, Marc Platt, Kristie Macosko Krieger

  • Brooklyn

Producers: Finola Dwyer & Amanda Posey

  • Ex Machina

Producers: Andrew Macdonald, Allon Reich

  • Mad Max: Fury Road

Producers: Doug Mitchell & George Miller

  • The Martian

Producers: Simon Kinberg, Ridley Scott, Michael Schaefer, Mark Huffam

  • The Revenant

Producers: Arnon Milchan, Steve Golin, Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Mary Parent, Keith Redmon

  • Sicario

Producers: Basil Iwanyk, Edward L. McDonnell, Molly Smith

  • Spotlight

Producers: Michael Sugar & Steve Golin, Nicole Rocklin, Blye Pagon Faust

  • Straight Outta Compton

Producers: Ice Cube, Matt Alvarez, F. Gary Gray, Dr. Dre, Scott Bernstein

 

 

The Award for Outstanding Producer of Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures:

  • Anomalisa

Producers: Rosa Tran, Duke Johnson, Charlie Kaufman

  • The Good Dinosaur

Producer: Denise Ream

  • Inside Out

Producer: Jonas Rivera

  • Minions

Producers: Chris Meledandri, Janet Healy

  • The Peanuts Movie

Producers: Craig Schulz, Michael J. Travers

 

The Award for Outstanding Producer of Documentary Theatrical Motion Pictures:

  • Amy

Producer: James Gay-Rees

  • The Hunting Ground

Producer: Amy Ziering

  • The Look of Silence

Producer: Signe Byrge Sørensen

  • Meru

Producers: Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi, Jimmy Chin

  • Something Better to Come

Producers: Sigrid Dyekjær, Hanna Polak

 

The David L. Wolper Award for Outstanding Producer of Long-Form Television:

*The Long-Form Television category encompasses both movies of the week and mini-series. 

 

  • American Crime (Season 1)

Producers: John Ridley, Michael McDonald, Julie Hébert, Stacy Littlejohn, Diana Son, Keith Huff, Lori-Etta Taub

  • American Horror Story: Hotel (Season 5)

Producers: Brad Falchuk, Ryan Murphy, Brad Buecker, Tim Minear, Jennifer Salt, James Wong, Alexis Martin Woodall, Robert M. Williams Jr.

  • Fargo (Season 2)

Producers: Noah Hawley, John Cameron, Ethan Coen, Joel Coen, Warren Littlefield, Kim Todd

  • True Detective (Season 2)

Producers: Nic Pizzolatto, Scott Stephens, Steve Golin, Aida Rodgers

  • A Very Murray Christmas

Producers: Sofia Coppola, Roman Coppola, Mitch Glazer, Tony Hernandez, Bill Murray, Michael Zakin

 

The Norman Felton Award for Outstanding Producer of Episodic Television, Drama:

  • Better Call Saul (Season 1)

Producers: Vince Gilligan, Peter Gould, Melissa Bernstein, Mark Johnson, Stewart A. Lyons, Thomas Schnauz, Gennifer Hutchison, Nina Jack, Diane Mercer, Bob Odenkirk 

  • Game of Thrones (Season 5)

Producers: David Benioff, D.B. Weiss, Bernadette Caulfield, Frank Doelger, Carolyn Strauss, Bryan Cogman, Lisa McAtackney, Chris Newman, Greg Spence

  • Homeland (Season 4)

Producers: Alex Gansa, Alexander Cary, Lesli Linka Glatter, Howard Gordon, Chip Johannessen, Meredith Stiehm, Patrick Harbinson, Michael Klick, Claire Danes, Lauren White

  • House of Cards (Season 3)

Producers: Beau Willimon, Dana Brunetti, John David Coles, Josh Donen, David Fincher, Eric Roth, Kevin Spacey, John Mankiewicz, Robert Zotnowski, Karen Moore 

  • Mad Men (Season 7B)

Producers: Matthew Weiner, Scott Hornbacher, Janet Leahy, Semi Chellas, Erin Levy, Jon Hamm, Blake McCormick, Tom Smuts

 

 

The Danny Thomas Award for Outstanding Producer of Episodic Television, Comedy:

  • Inside Amy Schumer (Season 3)

Producers: Amy Schumer, Daniel Powell, Jessi Klein, Steven Ast, Tony Hernandez, Kim Caramele, Ryan Cunningham, Kevin Kane, Ayesha Rokadia

  • Modern Family (Season 6)

Producers: Steven Levitan, Christopher Lloyd, Paul Corrigan, Abraham Higginbotham, Jeff Morton, Jeffrey Richman, Brad Walsh, Danny Zuker, Vali Chandrasekaran, Megan Ganz, Elaine Ko, Kenny Schwartz, Chuck Tatham, Rick Wiener, Chris Smirnoff, Sally Young

  • Silicon Valley (Season 2)

Producers: Mike Judge, Alec Berg, Jim Kleverweis, Clay Tarver, Dan O’Keefe, Michael Rotenberg, Tom Lassally

  • Transparent (Season 1)

Producers: Jill Soloway, Andrea Sperling, Victor Hsu, Nisha Ganatra, Rick Rosenthal, Bridget Bedard

  • Veep (Season 4)

Producers: Armando Iannucci, Chris Addison, Simon Blackwell, Christopher Godsick, Stephanie Laing, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Frank Rich, Tony Roche, Kevin Cecil, Roger Drew, Sean Gray, Ian Martin, Georgia Pritchett, David Quantick, Andy Riley, Will Smith, Bill Hill

 

 

The Award for Outstanding Producer of Non-Fiction Television:

  • 30 for 30 (Season 6)

Producers: Connor Schell, John Dahl, Bill Simmons, Erin Leyden, Andrew Billman, Marquis Daisy, Libby Geist

  • Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown (Season 3)

Producers: Anthony Bourdain, Christopher Collins, Lydia Tenaglia, Sandra Zweig

  • The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst (Season 1)

Producers: Marc Smerling, Andrew Jarecki, Jason Blum

  • Shark Tank (Season 6)

Producers: Mark Burnett, Clay Newbill, Yun Lingner, Max Swedlow, Jim Roush, Brandon Wallace, Becky Blitz, Laura Roush, Shaun Polakow, Phil Gurin

  • Vice (Season 3)

Producers: BJ Levin, Bill Maher, Eddy Moretti, Shane Smith, Jonah Kaplan, Tim Clancy, Ben Anderson, Shawn Killebrew

 

The Award for Outstanding Producer of Competition Television:

  • The Amazing Race (Seasons 25 and 26)

Producers: Jerry Bruckheimer, Bertram van Munster, Jonathan Littman, Elise Doganieri, Mark Vertullo

  • Dancing with the Stars (Seasons 19 and 20)

Producers: Rob Wade, Ashley Edens-Shaffer, Joe Sungkur

  • Project Runway (Season 13)

Producers: Jonathan Murray, Sara Rea, Desiree Gruber, Jane Cha, Heidi Klum, Tim Gunn, Teri Weideman

  • Top Chef (Season 12)

Producers: Daniel Cutforth, Tom Colicchio, Chaz Gray, Casey Kriley, Padma Lakshmi, Jane Lipsitz, Doneen Arquines, Erica Ross

  • The Voice (Seasons 7 and 8)

Producers: Audrey Morrissey, Mark Burnett, John de Mol, Marc Jansen, Lee Metzger, Chad Hines, Jim Roush, Kyra Thompson, Mike Yurchuk, Amanda Zucker, Carson Daly

 

 

The Award for Outstanding Producer of Live Entertainment & Talk Television:

  • The Colbert Report (Season 11)

Producers: Stephen T. Colbert, Tom Purcell, Jon Stewart, Meredith Bennett, Barry Julien, Emily Lazar, Tanya Michnevich Bracco, Paul Dinello, Matt Lappin

  • Key & Peele (Season 4)

Producers: Jay Martel, Ian Roberts, Keegan Michael Key, Jordan Peele, Joel Zadak, Peter Principato, Peter Atencio, Linda Morel

  • Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (Season 2)

Producers: Tim Carvell, John Oliver, Liz Stanton

  • Real Time with Bill Maher (Season 13)

Producers: Bill Maher, Scott Carter, Sheila Griffiths, Marc Gurvitz, Billy Martin, Dean E. Johnsen, Matt Wood

  • The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon (Season 2)

Producers: Lorne Michaels, Jamie Granet Bederman, Katie Hockmeyer, Jim Juvonen, Brian McDonald, Josh Lieb, Gavin Purcell

 

 

The Award for Outstanding Sports Program:

  • Back on Board: Greg Louganis
  • E:60
  • Hard Knocks: Training Camp with the Houston Texans
  • Kareem: Minority of One
  • Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel

 

The Award for Outstanding Digital Series:

  • 30 for 30 Shorts
  • Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee
  • Epic Rap Battles of History
  • Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.: Double Agent
  • This American Life Presents: Videos 4 U

The Award for Outstanding Children’s Program:

  • Doc McStuffins
  • The Fairly OddParents
  • Octonauts
  • Sesame Street
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
  • Toy Story That Time Forgot

 

The Milestone Award: Jim Gianopulos

The David O. Selznick Achievement Award: David Heyman

The Norman Lear Achievement Award in Television: Shonda Rhimes

The Stanley Kramer Award: The Hunting Ground

The Visionary Vanguard Award: Industrial Light & Magic (ILM)

 

About the Producers Guild of America (PGA)

The Producers Guild of America is the non-profit trade group that represents, protects and promotes the interests of all members of the producing team in film, television and new media. The Producers Guild has more than 7,000 members who work together to protect and improve their careers, the industry and community by providing members with employment opportunities, seeking to expand health benefits,promoting fair and impartial standards for the awarding of producing credits, as well as other education and advocacy efforts such as encouraging sustainable production practices. For more information and the latest updates, please visit Producers Guild of America websites and follow on social media:

 

Websites: www.producersguild.orgwww.pgagreen.orgwww.pgadiversity.org

Twitter: @ProducersGuild

Facebook: www.facebook.com/pga

YouTube: www.youtube.com/producersguild

Instagram: www.instagram.com/producersguild

Hashtag: #PGAwards

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David Heyman - January Cover

Posted By Chris Green, Tuesday, January 12, 2016

David Heyman would be the first to admit that he’s been fortunate. The son of a celebrated producer on one side and a legitimate film finance pioneer (go ahead, look it up) on the other, Heyman’s path into the entertainment industry was a pretty well-paved one. It wasn’t the family name, however, that first spotted the potential in a children’s novel titled Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, but an instinct for story that had been honed through years of work as a producer and studio executive.


From the moment he plucked then-unknown J.K. Rowling’s manuscript off the slush pile, and subsequently through eight feature films, four directors and two Albus Dumbledores, David Heyman was the faithful steward of the big-screen existence of Harry Potter. When it was all over, he had produced one of the most revered and beloved film franchises of all time. Since its conclusion, he’s continued to collaborate with top talent from the potter films, most notably director Alfonso Cuarón, with whom he shared an Oscar nomination (and won the PGA’s Darryl F. Zanuck award) for the boundary-pushing Gravity. Subsequently he also put on screen such diverse stories as the family-friendly Paddington, the powerful holocaust tale The Boy In The Striped Pajamas, and next year, writer-director Derek Cianfrance’s stark period drama The Light Between Oceans.

This season finds him in production mode, producing the potter prequel Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them, set for release next year starring Oscar winner Eddie Redmayne. It was during a long, night-time car ride from the Fantastic Beasts set in the north of England to his home in London that David Heyman caught up with Produced By, covering even more ground via conversation than his driver did on the m1.

So what were your early experiences in the
industry like?

I grew up with two parents in the industry. Both are passionate, committed and tenacious and I was exposed to the highs and lows of the business from a young age. I learned a lot from them. My mother, Norma, produced Dangerous Liaisons and many other films. My father, John, is a pioneer in film finance and was once an agent to stars like Richard Burton, Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Harris, so you can only imagine the chaos in the Heyman household.

I worked as a runner on various films, like Ragtime and Lords of Discipline. After I graduated college, I travelled to India and ultimately ended up as a runner on A Passage to India, which was a fantastic experience. I actually doubled for Alec Guinness in one scene. At 21 years old I didn’t look very much like him but I probably had more energy than he did cycling around in southern India with spectacles and a turban. I was a huge admirer of director David Lean and the humanity in his films, his ability to combine the intimate with the epic. He had worked as an editor before becoming a director, and he had literally edited the film in his head before he shot it. While working in post-production, I saw that he had often shot only what he intended to use in the final film. If an actor wasn’t going to deliver a line on camera, he often wouldn’t film them saying it!


he knew what he wanted.

Yeah. It was an incredible privilege to watch him work. After that, I moved to New York to work in development with my father. Around that time, I was approached by Lisa Henson, a friend from university, who had just been promoted to VP at Warner Bros. and was looking for someone to replace her. She asked if I had any interest in moving to LA. I didn’t know whether LA would be my home forever, but it certainly would be an invaluable experience to work in the system as opposed to on the fringes, which was where I was.

Lucy Fisher, Lisa’s boss, visited NewYork and we met and got on, and she asked me to work with her. It was a terrific opportunity and education. One of my tasks was doing story notes. During my first week, two of the projects I covered were Police Academy … I can’t remember which, Police Academy 4 or 5


Well, they’re all so distinctive.

[laughs] Yeah, exactly. The second was GoodFellas.

Really? That was your first week? Police Academy 5 and GoodFellas?

I’ll never forget having to do those story notes. The GoodFellas script was remarkable, but I managed to muster a page of notes to justify my job and gave them to an executive … I’m not going to say which executive it was, but it wasn’t Lucy! They said, "These are good, but you’ve missed the most important note of all: How do we introduce Henry Hill in the most sympathetic light?” and I said, "But it’s a Martin Scorsese film. They’re not about sympathetic characters. They’re about characters who may be unsympathetic, but you come to understand through the course of the film why they are as they are.” Didn’t matter; I was told to include the note, which I did. Martin Scorsese and Irwin Winkler ignored it completely, and Henry Hill was introduced in GoodFellas exactly as he was in the script.


For how long were you at Warners?

I started at Warner Bros. in January ’86. In October ’87 Roger Birnbaum offered me to be a VP at United Artists. I was 26 years old and it seemed like an offer I had to accept. I spoke to Lucy and she asked that I not leave. But I was young and foolish and impetuous, and took the job anyway. I was there for eight months, then the writers’ strike happened. [laughs]


Whoops.

And as the last person hired, I was the first person fired. That lead to a period of travel and reflection for me. By the end of it, I thought, you know what? I want to be a producer. A young producer, Neal Moritz, who had pitched to me when I was an exec, suggested we work together and we partnered for around five years. We worked out of his house in Westwood. We really complemented each other. Neal harbored no doubts. I questioned everything. We could say exactly what we wanted to each other without being offended, because it was all about getting things done. And we trusted each other. We still do. It was brilliant.

At the time, I was really interested in urban films, and obsessed with hip-hop. Carhartt jacket, hoodie, Timberland boots. You wouldn’t believe it now looking at me, but yeah, that was me. My closest friend, Peter Frankfurt, gave me a script by Gerard Brown and Ernest Dickerson, who was Spike Lee’s cinematographer. Several years earlier, I had tried to persuade my father to finance She’s Gotta Have It, but hadn’t pushed hard enough! I read the script and loved it. Juice wound up being financed by Chris Blackwell. We went to New York and began the casting process, with Ernest directing. One of the people who we cast was a rapper named Tupac Shakur. He came in with another rapper called Shock G, who was auditioning. Shock G didn’t work out, but Tupac asked if he could try. And just hit it out of the park. Everybody’s jaw dropped. He left the room, shut the door, and then stuck his head back in and said, "By the way, you’d better give me the part because I know where y’all live.” And he shut the door again. He got the part. He had a wicked sense of humor. I adored him and respected him in so many ways. But he was self-destructive. I’m still sad that he’s no longer with us.

Anyway, it was such an exciting time. We were shooting up in Harlem; I’d never produced a film before. We were working with a great cast and crew, from whom I learned so much. We ultimately sold it to Paramount and actually did quite well.


Sounds like a very invigorating way to
start a career.

After that, I made a couple of other films. And frankly, they were not "me.” I didn’t want to live in LA anymore. I wanted to leave because in some way I felt that LA was "winning.” [laughs] Which is ironic, because Neal is now one of the most successful producers in the world, and I’ve been pretty lucky myself. We’ve done better apart than we did together. But I hope one day Neal and I will work together again.

So I left LA, went first to New York and then London. It was the time of Cool Britannia. There was Oasis and Blur and Trainspotting and Four Weddings and a Funeral. It was very alive. Warners gave me a first-look deal which allowed me to pay for my overhead and a small office that I’m still in today. I set out to be a bridge between the U.S. and U.K. and decided to make books a central part of my business. One, I’m a voracious reader. Two, books had probably the best ratio of development to film at the time. At the time, the British books weren’t so aggressively pursued, so I thought I could distinguish myself.

Ned Tanen, head of Universal in the 80s, once gave me some wonderful advice. He said, "If you want to work in the film industry, you should get a job in distribution.” I asked, "Why?” He said, "Because nobody else wants to do it.” The point that he was making was: don’t follow, lead. You’ve got to look for ways to differentiate yourself and not do what everybody else is doing. Anyway, I went around, met editors, agents and publishers. We had three shelves for incoming manuscripts and screenplays: priority, medium priority and low priority. Tanya Seghatchian, my very bright development executive, read an article in a trade publication about a book that hadn’t yet been published. She called the agent. The book came in and sat firmly on the low priority shelf for a couple of weeks before Nisha, my secretary, who only read material from that bottom shelf, took it home. At our Monday morning I asked, "Anybody read anything good?” And Nisha replied, "Yeah, I read Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone.” I said, "Hmm, not sure about that title. What’s it about?” "It’s about a young boy who goes to wizard school,” she replied. My interest was piqued.

I took it home that night and I fell in love. I couldn’t put it down and there began my Potter odyssey. I sent it to a friend of mine at Warner Bros, Lionel Wigram, whom I had known since I was 14. He responded, but I’m not sure many others at the studio really got it at the time. It hadn’t yet become a phenomenon. I think they thought, "Listen, we invested this money in Heyman. Let’s give him a shot.” They had no idea if it was going to pay off. Neither did I. I thought if I was lucky, it might be my Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. I had no idea that it would become what it became. What I did know was that I connected with it. It made me laugh. It moved me. I related to Harry and the characters at Hogwarts. We all, in our own way, feel like outsiders. And no matter who we are, no matter how successful, no matter how happily married we are or what good friends we have, there are times where we feel alone. At least I do. And I felt that story was something that people could connect with. It was about something: being true to yourself. It was about loyalty and friendship and fighting prejudice and so much more.

So after a lengthy negotiation, on the eve of the U.S. publication, Warners optioned it. We met a lot of writers, and heard different takes. One wanted to set it in America; that was not an option! We finally hired Steve Kloves. He was an unusual choice, I suppose, because he hadn’t written any family films. But that wasn’t an issue for me. He was a sophisticated writer, who wrote rich, layered characters. Also, he was brilliant at capturing an author’s voice and the most important thing was to retain the spirit of Jo Rowling’s writing. When they met, Jo immediately liked him. So we had our screenwriter. As Kloves was writing the films, the books became wildly successful. All of a sudden they were No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 on the New York Times bestseller list. Now there’s all this pressure as he’s trying to finish the script. At the same time, Jo, who had written the first two or three novels essentially without any expectations, now had all this expectation. And she was struggling as she he had written herself into a little bit of a hole on Goblet of Fire but had a firm publication date! They really bonded through that shared experience and challenges.

Kloves delivered the script towards the end of 1999 and it was wonderful. Warners green-lit it immediately. We met a few directors and decided on Chris Columbus. He was such a passionate fan and wanted above all to be respectful of Jo and true to what she had written. Chris was beyond generous to me. He embraced me as a partner in the process and I learnt so much from him. The first person we hired was Stuart Craig, the great production designer. Then we began casting, scouring the U.K. to find our three young leads. By June, we felt like we had good options for Ron and Hermione but we didn’t have our Harry. We even, out of desperation, expanded the search to the U.S., Australia and New Zealand. We looked everywhere. And here we were, less than 10 weeks before filming. It was a scary time indeed … we were making a film called Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone and we didn’t have our Harry Potter.

One evening, Kloves and I went to the theater and seated in the audience, I noticed this boy with big round blue eyes. He seemed an old soul in a young body. And then this voice called, "David, great to see you.” Sitting next to the boy was his father, an agent I knew called Alan Radcliffe. The play started but I paid little attention to what was going on up on stage. I kept on turning around and looking at this boy. When the play finished, I went to find Alan and his son, but they’d gone. So the following morning I called ICM and asked if Alan would allow Daniel to visit the studio to meet Chris. Alan said, "Why don’t you meet him first, and then we can decide.” So Dan, his mum and I went out for a cup of tea and we spent two hours chatting. Dan had this incredible energy. He was so curious and intelligent—a curiosity and intelligence that have helped make him the actor he is today.

Afterwards Alan agreed that Dan should meet with Chris, who really liked him—actually Chris had spotted him in a production of Great Expectations but been told that he didn’t want to audition for Potter—and brought him in for the final auditions. Chris looked at three kids for each part, in different combinations. When we screened the footage, it was clear to all Emma and Rupert were our Hermione and Ron. But there were some who weren’t so sure about Harry and so I suggested we sleep on it. The following morning we watched the screen test again and Chris announced, "It’s Dan Radcliffe.” Phew! We couldn’t have done better! A couple of days later we had to do a press conference and the journalists were asking all sorts of inappropriate questions. I’ll never forget, one asked Rupert, "So how much are you making for this?” and this 12 year old boy quips, "You know, I don’t know how much in Muggle money, but I do know in Knuts and Galleons, if you want.”

Then we cast the other roles. Every adult we approached wanted to do it because their children or grandchildren wouldn’t have it otherwise. Richard Harris agreed because his granddaughter, Ella, said she wouldn’t talk to him if he said no.

We made the first two back-to-back, we prepping the second as we were posting the first. Chris did a brilliant job. I wouldn’t be sitting here today having a conversation with you were it not for Chris. He cast our three leads and so many others, chose Stuart and many of our department heads and helped create the film world and an atmosphere and culture in front of and behind the camera that lasted till the end. And he directed two beautiful films.


How did you settle on Alfonso Cuaron to direct the third film?

Towards the end of the second film we had to decide on who would do the third. I wanted Alfonso. I had loved his first film and also A Little Princess, which Jo had loved, too, so I enlisted her support. It may have seemed strange to look at Y Tu Mama Tambien and think, this is the person to direct Harry Potter. What would Harry, Ron and Hermione get up to in this film if this man directs it? But it was a great film; it was clear to me that he was the right director. Y Tu Mama Tambien was about the last moments of being a teenager, and Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban was about the first moments of being a teenager. Alfonso understood the nuances of teenage life and the way that teenagers communicated. And in A Little Princess he had shown an imagination that was perfect for our world. If this series was to go to the end, we needed to shake it up, to have a visionary filmmaker to make it his own. And that was Alfonso.

And so the films were growing up, just like our young actors. The third film, in terms of box office, was the least successful, but it was more mature, more contemporary and that led us in a direction we continued on till the end.

Alfonso decided that he didn’t want to direct the fourth film, so we hired Mike Newell. We hadn’t had a British director yet, which was surprising given how British (yet universal) the books were. Mike was a really good actors’ director and it was important, as the young cast grew, that they continued to be challenged. He was a wonderful director of romantic comedy and thrillers, both of which were essential elements of Goblet of Fire.

And then came the fifth film, and the Potter world was becoming more political. It was very important that we imbue the film with the spirit of a political thriller as the kids come together to form an underground revolutionary movement, a bit like the French Resistance. And so we hired David Yates, who had made Sex Traffic and State of Play, two dynamic political thrillers for the BBC, directorial tour de forces that were amongst the best TV I had seen. And he brilliantly directed the last four films in the series.

One of the things I’m proudest of in the Potter series is that in each film a director’s vision shines through. Jo Rowling’s voice is front and center, clearly, but each director channeled that voice and has made their films their own. Without that voice, a film is a blancmange and I am not a fan of blancmanges. A director with a vision is essential, even, or maybe especially within a franchise. Having said that, we never approached Harry Potter as a franchise. We were simply trying to make each film the best it could be!

While making the Potters we had marriages and divorces, young ones beginning school and graduating, people who just started off in the business on the first film worked their way up to become heads of departments by the end. It was an amazing thing to be a part of. We were like a family—mostly functional, sometimes dysfunctional—but a family. The last day on Potter was a very emotional day … Lots of tears and hugs. We’d seen births, deaths and the entire cycle of life. So it was an emotional moment.


I can imagine, especially having lost people along the way.

Yes. We had indeed. As we were finishing the eighth film, I was approached by Alfonso, who was and remains one of my closest friends, about Gravity. It took me not a moment to say yes. Alfonso is a master filmmaker and to work with him his a privilege. It’s hard, but it is a privilege. He pushes everything, everybody to the absolute limit. I am a better producer for having worked with Alfonso Cuarón. He’s a truly brave filmmaker. He dares one to fail. He dares himself to fail. But he never does.

Alfonso doesn’t want to direct a film he knows how to make before he starts working on it. In Gravity, which was set entirely in space, he wanted to create an immersive experience, with long, unbroken shots. Given this, how were we going to create the illusion of Zero G? The answer was ultimately to develop entirely new technology specifically for this film.

We began with a lengthy period of R&D. Alfonso and Tim Webber, our inspired VFX Supervisor, and a stuntwoman went up on the Vomit Comet (the airplane NASA uses to train astronauts) to get a feel for movement in a weightless environment. Alfonso and Tim loved the experience, but the stuntwoman threw up the entire time.

And we tried the traditional approach of hanging actors in suits from wires, but it quickly became clear that this was too limiting. Sandy Bullock is one of the most gifted and committed actors I have ever worked with and dealt with countless challenges on the film. But even she could not have hidden the effects of gravity or have endured hanging upside down for hours on end! The breakthrough came in two stages. First, Tim Webber suggested that we only shoot the faces of the actors and that everything else be created in the computer.

Second, one of our two executives, Chris deFaria, asked, "Why don’t you have the camera go around the actor sitting on an office chair?” The principle of what Chris suggested was right, but the solution was wrong. It made perfect sense that all the motion be created by the camera, the actor would hardly have to move at all. We began working with a two-ton robot with a camera at the end of it, the same kind of robot they use in manufacturing cars, which could make repeated movements with great accuracy. Part of the problem was now solved, but we were still struggling to move the lights quickly or precisely enough.

That was when Chivo [Emmanuel Lubezki], our genius cameraman, along with Tim Webber came up with the lightbox, a 9’x9’ box made up of LED panels, on which was screened what Sandy Bullock was meant to see and which provided the light source. There was a tilt-rig for the actor in the center of the lightbox, and track leading away. on which was the robot.

The long shots were sometimes composed of 20, 25, 30 separate shots. Because the end of each shot had to connect with the beginning of the next, all the camera movements had to be absolutely precise. So the entire film was prevised and prelit and camera movement, tilt-rig movement, light movement were all preprogrammed.

We had no idea how we were going to make Gravity at the beginning. We had to explore. We went on a journey. And at times you go, "Oh, no. Is this really gonna work?” But ultimately you never lose faith because Alfonso is a pioneer, he’s bold and brave. And together with his creative partners Tim and Chivo we believed we would get there in the end.

At the beginning of the preview process, the film wasn’t testing well because it had none of the backdrops. When you’re showing the film to people with grey bodies and no environment it’s not quite as immersive as you might like! [laughs]


Yeah, not quite.

But when we went to Venice and screened it for an audience as a finished film for the first time the response was extraordinary. Alfonso’s courage had paid off.

While we were in the last stages of postproduction and the beginning of the awards season, I began producing a film called Paddington, working with a wonderfully imaginative writer-director, Paul King. He was very much like Paddington himself … warm and generous and very funny. We developed it at Warners but they put it in turnaround. We took it to every studio and they all passed. The French company, StudioCanal, ended up financing it. And now I’m in post production on Derek Cianfrance’s The Light Between Oceans, starring Michael Fassbender, Alicia Vikander and Rachel Weisz, and in production on Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, which I’m afraid I can’t really say that much about.


What’s it like to be back in Jo Rowling’s world?

Oh, it’s great. The story takes place 70-plus years before Potter. It’s inspired by a book that Jo wrote for comic relief. It’s "authored” by a man called Newt Scamander, who’s a magizoologist, and it’s a story of his adventures in New York in the 1920s. It’s funny and thrilling and fresh and original, and features adults, not children. I think it will be enjoyed by Potter and "non-Potter” fans alike.


You really think it might appeal to the five "non-Potter” fans that are still out there?

[laughs] I hope so. It’s rich and resonant, and fun and moving. It’s a really delightful mix. And its great to be back in Jo’s wizarding world and to be working with David Yates again.


So what advice would you give to younger producers starting their careers today?

I would offer a couple of pieces of advice to a young producer.

I would recommend a young producer think beyond film. Don’t give up on movies. Movies are wonderful and I hope they never die. But as a story teller, think about television, think about short form-content, think about video games, look at other ways to tell stories. A producer in 10 years time is going to be looking at a very different landscape than a producer today.

As a producer you are only as good as the artists with whom you work, so you must seek out that extraordinary talent, find it, nurture it and support it.

Most important, you’ve got to listen to your gut. And if you believe in something, don’t give up on it! Gravity was a project that many thought wouldn’t work. Paddington was rejected again and again and again. Potter was rejected by many agents and publishers. My father told me about how Winston Churchill, at the age of 90, hobbled to the lectern to deliver a speech to graduating students. "I have just nine words of advice to give to you,’ he said. "Never give in! Never give in! Never give in!” So … never give in!

- View all article from the December/January edition of Produced By magazine

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2016 Producers Guild Awards Nominees

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, January 05, 2016

LOS ANGELES (January 5, 2016) – The Producers Guild of America (PGA) announced today the motion picture, long-form television, digital series, sports programs and additional television nominations for the 27th Annual Producers Guild Awards. The categories include: The Darryl F. Zanuck Award for Outstanding Producer of Theatrical Motion Pictures; The Award for Outstanding Producer of Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures; The David L. Wolper Award for Outstanding Producer of Long-Form Television; Outstanding Sports Program; and Outstanding Digital Series. The feature documentary film category and other television category nominations were previously announced by the PGA in late 2015.

All 2016 Producers Guild Award winners will be announced on Saturday, January 23, 2016 at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza in Los Angeles. This year, the Producers Guild will present special honors to Jim Gianopulos (Milestone Award), Shonda Rhimes (Norman Lear Achievement Award in Television), David Heyman (David O. Selznick Achievement Award in Theatrical Motion Pictures), THE HUNTING GROUND (Stanley Kramer Award), and Industrial Light & Magic (Visionary Vanguard Award). The 2016 Producers Guild Awards Co-Chairs are Michael De Luca (THE SOCIAL NETWORK, CAPTAIN PHILLIPS) and Jennifer Todd (ALICE IN WONDERLAND, CELESTE AND JESSE FOREVER). Sponsors of the event include: Cadillac, the Official Automotive Partner of the PGA; Delta Air Lines, the Official Airline Partner of the PGA and sponsor of the 2016 Visionary Vanguard Award; PRG, Production Resource Group, a PGA annual sponsor; Panasonic, a PGA annual sponsor; Univision Communications, sponsor of the Producers Guild Awards cocktail reception; and Piper-Heidsieck Champagne.

The 2016 Producers Guild nominated films and television programs are listed below by category with previously announced nominees, accomponied with producers’ names. Digital series and sports programs were not vetted for producer eligibility this year, but winners in these categories will be announced at the official ceremony on January 23rd.



The theatrical motion picture nominees are:

The Darryl F. Zanuck Award for Outstanding Producer of Theatrical Motion Pictures:

  •  The Big Short

Producers: Brad Pitt & Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner

  • Bridge of Spies

Producers: Steven Spielberg, Marc Platt, Kristie Macosko Krieger

  • Brooklyn

Producers: Finola Dwyer & Amanda Posey

  • Ex Machina

Producers: Andrew Macdonald, Allon Reich

  • Mad Max: Fury Road

Producers: Doug Mitchell & George Miller

  • The Martian

Producers: Simon Kinberg, Ridley Scott, Michael Schaefer, Mark Huffam

  • The Revenant

Producers: Arnon Milchan, Steve Golin, Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Mary Parent, Keith Redmon

  • Sicario

Producers: Basil Iwanyk, Edward L. McDonnell, Molly Smith

  • Spotlight

Producers: Michael Sugar & Steve Golin, Nicole Rocklin, Blye Pagon Faust

  • Straight Outta Compton

Producers: Ice Cube, Matt Alvarez, F. Gary Gray, Dr. Dre, Scott Bernstein


The Award for Outstanding Producer of Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures:

  • Anomalisa

Producers: Rosa Tran, Duke Johnson, Charlie Kaufman

  • The Good Dinosaur

Producer: Denise Ream

  • Inside Out

Producer: Jonas Rivera

  • Minions

Producers: Chris Meledandri, Janet Healy

  • The Peanuts Movie

Producers: Craig Schulz, Michael J. Travers

 

The Award for Outstanding Producer of Documentary Theatrical Motion Pictures:

  • Amy

Producer: James Gay-Rees

  • The Hunting Ground

Producer: Amy Ziering

  • The Look of Silence

Producer: Signe Byrge Sørensen

  • Meru

Producers: Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi, Jimmy Chin

  • Something Better to Come

Producers: Sigrid Dyekjær, Hanna Polak


The television nominees are:

The David L. Wolper Award for Outstanding Producer of Long-Form Television:

*The Long-Form Television category encompasses both movies of the week and mini-series. 

  • American Crime (Season 1)

Producers: John Ridley, Michael McDonald, Julie Hébert, Stacy Littlejohn, Diana Son, Keith Huff, Lori-Etta Taub

  • American Horror Story: Hotel (Season 5)

Producers: Brad Falchuk, Ryan Murphy, Brad Buecker, Tim Minear, Jennifer Salt, James Wong, Alexis Martin Woodall, Robert M. Williams Jr.

  • Fargo (Season 2)

Producers: Noah Hawley, John Cameron, Ethan Coen, Joel Coen, Warren Littlefield, Kim Todd

  • True Detective (Season 2)

Producers: Nic Pizzolatto, Scott Stephens, Steve Golin, Aida Rodgers

  • A Very Murray Christmas

Producers: Sofia Coppola, Roman Coppola, Mitch Glazer, Tony Hernandez, Bill Murray, Michael Zakin

 

The Norman Felton Award for Outstanding Producer of Episodic Television, Drama:

  • Better Call Saul (Season 1)

Producers: Vince Gilligan, Peter Gould, Melissa Bernstein, Mark Johnson, Stewart A. Lyons, Thomas Schnauz, Gennifer Hutchison, Nina Jack, Diane Mercer, Bob Odenkirk 

  • Game of Thrones (Season 5)

Producers: David Benioff, D.B. Weiss, Bernadette Caulfield, Frank Doelger, Carolyn Strauss, Bryan Cogman, Lisa McAtackney, Chris Newman, Greg Spence

  • Homeland (Season 4)

Producers: Alex Gansa, Alexander Cary, Lesli Linka Glatter, Howard Gordon, Chip Johannessen, Meredith Stiehm, Patrick Harbinson, Michael Klick, Claire Danes, Lauren White

  • House of Cards (Season 3)

Producers: Beau Willimon, Dana Brunetti, John David Coles, Josh Donen, David Fincher, Eric Roth, Kevin Spacey, John Mankiewicz, Robert Zotnowski, Karen Moore 

  • Mad Men (Season 7B)

Producers: Matthew Weiner, Scott Hornbacher, Janet Leahy, Semi Chellas, Erin Levy, Jon Hamm, Blake McCormick, Tom Smuts


The Danny Thomas Award for Outstanding Producer of Episodic Television, Comedy:

  • Inside Amy Schumer (Season 3)

Producers: Amy Schumer, Daniel Powell, Jessi Klein, Steven Ast, Tony Hernandez, Kim Caramele, Ryan Cunningham, Kevin Kane, Ayesha Rokadia

  • Modern Family (Season 6)

Producers: Steven Levitan, Christopher Lloyd, Paul Corrigan, Abraham Higginbotham, Jeff Morton, Jeffrey Richman, Brad Walsh, Danny Zuker, Vali Chandrasekaran, Megan Ganz, Elaine Ko, Kenny Schwartz, Chuck Tatham, Rick Wiener, Chris Smirnoff, Sally Young

  • Silicon Valley (Season 2)

Producers: Mike Judge, Alec Berg, Jim Kleverweis, Clay Tarver, Dan O’Keefe, Michael Rotenberg, Tom Lassally

  • Transparent (Season 1)

Producers: Jill Soloway, Andrea Sperling, Victor Hsu, Nisha Ganatra, Rick Rosenthal, Bridget Bedard

  • Veep (Season 4)

Producers: Armando Iannucci, Chris Addison, Simon Blackwell, Christopher Godsick, Stephanie Laing, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Frank Rich, Tony Roche, Kevin Cecil, Roger Drew, Sean Gray, Ian Martin, Georgia Pritchett, David Quantick, Andy Riley, Will Smith, Bill Hill


The Award for Outstanding Producer of Non-Fiction Television:

  • 30 for 30 (Season 6)

Producers: Connor Schell, John Dahl, Bill Simmons, Erin Leyden, Andrew Billman, Marquis Daisy, Libby Geist

  • Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown (Season 3)

Producers: Anthony Bourdain, Christopher Collins, Lydia Tenaglia, Sandra Zweig

  • The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst (Season 1)

Producers: Marc Smerling, Andrew Jarecki, Jason Blum

  • Shark Tank (Season 6)

Producers: Mark Burnett, Clay Newbill, Yun Lingner, Max Swedlow, Jim Roush, Brandon Wallace, Becky Blitz, Laura Roush, Shaun Polakow, Phil Gurin

  • Vice (Season 3)

Producers: BJ Levin, Bill Maher, Eddy Moretti, Shane Smith, Jonah Kaplan, Tim Clancy, Ben Anderson, Shawn Killebrew


The Award for Outstanding Producer of Competition Television:

  • The Amazing Race (Seasons 25 and 26)

Producers: Jerry Bruckheimer, Bertram van Munster, Jonathan Littman, Elise Doganieri, Mark Vertullo

  • Dancing with the Stars (Seasons 19 and 20)

Producers: Rob Wade, Ashley Edens-Shaffer, Joe Sungkur

  • Project Runway (Season 13)

Producers: Jonathan Murray, Sara Rea, Desiree Gruber, Jane Cha, Heidi Klum, Tim Gunn, Teri Weideman

  • Top Chef (Season 12)

Producers: Daniel Cutforth, Tom Colicchio, Chaz Gray, Casey Kriley, Padma Lakshmi, Jane Lipsitz, Doneen Arquines, Erica Ross

  • The Voice (Seasons 7 and 8)

Producers: Audrey Morrissey, Mark Burnett, John de Mol, Marc Jansen, Lee Metzger, Chad Hines, Jim Roush, Kyra Thompson, Mike Yurchuk, Amanda Zucker, Carson Daly


The Award for Outstanding Producer of Live Entertainment & Talk Television:

  • The Colbert Report (Season 11)

Producers: Stephen T. Colbert, Tom Purcell, Jon Stewart, Meredith Bennett, Barry Julien, Emily Lazar, Tanya Michnevich Bracco, Paul Dinello, Matt Lappin

  • Key & Peele (Season 4)

Producers: Jay Martel, Ian Roberts, Keegan Michael Key, Jordan Peele, Joel Zadak, Peter Principato, Peter Atencio, Linda Morel

  • Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (Season 2)

Producers: Tim Carvell, John Oliver, Liz Stanton

  • Real Time with Bill Maher (Season 13)

Producers: Bill Maher, Scott Carter, Sheila Griffiths, Marc Gurvitz, Billy Martin, Dean E. Johnsen, Matt Wood

  • The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon (Season 2)

Producers: Lorne Michaels, Jamie Granet Bederman, Katie Hockmeyer, Jim Juvonen, Brian McDonald, Josh Lieb, Gavin Purcell


The Award for Outstanding Sports Program:

  • Back on Board: Greg Louganis
  • E:60
  • Hard Knocks: Training Camp with the Houston Texans
  • Kareem: Minority of One
  • Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel

The Award for Outstanding Digital Series:

  • 30 for 30 Shorts
  • Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee
  • Epic Rap Battles of History
  • Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.: Double Agent
  • This American Life Presents: Videos 4 U

The Award for Outstanding Children’s Program:

  • Doc McStuffins
  • The Fairly OddParents
  • Octonauts
  • Sesame Street
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
  • Toy Story That Time Forgot


About the Producers Guild of America (PGA)

The Producers Guild of America is the non-profit trade group that represents, protects and promotes the interests of all members of the producing team in film, television and new media. The Producers Guild has more than 7,000 members who work together to protect and improve their careers, the industry and community by providing members with employment opportunities, seeking to expand health benefits,promoting fair and impartial standards for the awarding of producing credits, as well as other education and advocacy efforts such as encouraging sustainable production practices. For more information and the latest updates, please visit Producers Guild of America websites and follow on social media:

Websites: www.producersguild.orgwww.pgagreen.orgwww.pgadiversity.org

Twitter: @ProducersGuild

Facebook: www.facebook.com/pga

YouTube: www.youtube.com/producersguild

Instagram: www.instagram.com/producersguild

Hashtag: #PGAwards

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2016 Producers Guild Awards Honorees

Posted By Administration, Thursday, December 17, 2015

One of the awards season’s marquee events, the Producers Guild Awards celebrates the finest producing work of the year, and gives the Guild an opportunity to honor some of the living legends who have shaped our profession.

The list of recipients of honorary awards such as the Milestone Award, the David O. Selznick Achievement Award in Theatrical Motion Pictures and the Norman Lear Achievement Award in Television and the Visionary Vanguard Award read like a roster of the industry’s biggest names, including icons such as Steven Spielberg, Jerry Bruckheimer, Brian Grazer, J.J. Abrams, Steven Bochco, Clint Eastwood, Sherry Lansing, Robert Evans, Roger Corman and Lorne Michaels, extending back to such legends as Alfred Hitchcock, Walt Disney, Billy Wilder and Louis B. Mayer.  This year's honorees are:


The Milestone Award: Jim Gianopulos

The Milestone Award is the PGA’s highest honor, recognizing an individual or team who has made historic contributions to the entertainment industry. In the past, the Guild has paid tribute to such industry leaders as Clint Eastwood, Jeffrey Katzenberg, Steven Spielberg, James Cameron, Ron Meyer, Bob & Harvey Weinstein, Bob Iger, and the 2015 recipient Jon Feltheimer, among others.

Jim Gianopulos: "One of the great benefits of this job is to work with incredibly talented filmmakers and executives. I am truly thrilled to be honored and to celebrate their achievements with this prestigious award.”


The David O. Selznick Achievement Award: David Heyman

The David O. Selznick Achievement Award recognizes a producer's outstanding body of work in motion pictures.  The 2015 recipient of the David O. Selznick Award was Gale Anne Hurd. Previous recipients include Stanley Kramer, Billy Wilder, Clint Eastwood, Jerry Bruckheimer, Brian Grazer, Laura Ziskin, Kathleen Kennedy & Frank Marshall, Scott Rudin and Steven Spielberg.

David Heyman:  "I am honored to receive this award, named after such a giant of the industry, from my peers at the PGA. And as I look at the list of past recipients I am deeply humbled to join an illustrious group of filmmakers who have been such an inspiration to me over the years.”

 

The Norman Lear Achievement Award in Television: Shonda Rhimes

The Norman Lear Achievement Award recognizes a producer's outstanding body of work in television.  The 2015 recipient of the Norman Lear Award was Mark Gordon. Previous recipients include Chuck Lorre, J.J. Abrams, Dick Wolf, Jerry Bruckheimer, Lorne Michaels, David L. Wolper, Aaron Spelling, Carsey/Werner/Mandabach, Steven Bochco, David E. Kelley, Mark Burnett and Norman Lear, himself.

Shonda Rhimes:  "To be the recipient of an award bestowed upon me by my peers in the PGA is truly an honor. The fact that the award is named after a legendary producer whose work has had such an inspiring effect on my growth as a writer is genuinely gratifying. I couldn’t be more grateful for this special recognition.”


The Stanley Kramer Award: The Hunting Ground

The Stanley Kramer Award was established in 2002 to honor a production, producer or other individual whose achievement or contribution illuminates and raises public awareness of important social issues. Producer/director Stanley Kramer created some of the most powerful work in the history of American motion pictures, including such classics as Inherit The Wind, On The Beach, The Defiant Ones, and Guess Who's Coming To Dinner. The Stanley Kramer Award is determined by a seven-person committee appointed by the PGA’s Board of Directors, and operates independently of the Producers Guild Awards committee and the PGA staff.

Previous recipients of the Stanley Kramer Award include: An Inconvenient Truth, Hotel Rwanda, In America, Antwone Fisher, Precious, In The Land of Blood and Honey, Bully, Fruitvale Station and the 2015 honoree, The Normal Heart.

Producers Guild Awards Co-Chairs Michael De Luca and Jennifer Todd: "This powerful documentary gives a voice to the victims of student sexual assault – a national problem too long clouded in secrecy and shielded from public attention. The visceral reaction this film evokes has mobilized audiences worldwide to take action, and has served as a focal point in campus discussions and in revising institutional policies. The Producers Guild is honored to recognize The Hunting Ground and its contribution towards greater awareness of this national problem.”

 

The Visionary Vanguard Award: Industrial Light & Magic (ILM)

In prior years, the Guild presented its Visionary Award and Vanguard Award to separate recipients. This year, in light of the unique nature of ILM’s contributions to technology and entertainment, the Guild has combined the two awards into a single and distinctive honor. The Producers Guild 2016 Visionary Vanguard Award is sponsored by Delta Air Lines.

Lynwen Brennan:  "On behalf of all of us at Industrial Light & Magic I’d like to thank the Producers Guild for recognizing the company’s contribution to the film industry throughout the past 40 years. It’s been an incredible adventure since the day George Lucas first assembled his team of dreamers to create the special effects forStar Wars. Now, some 300 films later we’ve had the privilege of helping some of the mostvisionary filmmakers inthe industry create iconic moments that are forever part of our collective memory. I have been with ILM since 1986 and have been fortunate to have worked with some of the finest producers in the business,” added John Knoll. "The collaboration between filmmakers and the visual effects industry has never been closer, and it is great to be honored by our allies and friends that help us create the images that were dared to dream.”


On the evening of the Awards, Awards will be presented in the following competitive categories: Theatrical Motion Pictures, Documentary Motion Pictures, Animated Motion Pictures, Long-Form Television, Episodic Television - Drama, Episodic Television - Comedy, Non-Fiction Television, Live Entertainment & Talk Television, Competition Television.

Awards will also be announced in the following competitive categories: Children's Television, Sports Television, Digital Series.



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